Halloween Sales!

 

Happy almost Halloween, kittens! This is just a reminder that we’ve got some sales happening in honor of Halloween, because we all know it’s the best of all of the holidays.

First, get Renee’s horror/thriller tales, BAYOU BABY, IN THE BONES, DIRTY TRUTHS, THE LEGEND OF JACKSON MURPHY, and SMOLDER for just 99 cents each from October 27th to November 1st.

Steve Wetherell’s SHOOT THE DEAD, as well as selected titles in the Authors and Dragons’ SHINGLES SERIES will be 99 cents each as well from October 27th to November 1st.

CM Saunders is having a sale on his X series, so X: A COLLECTION OF HORROR, X2: ANOTHER COLLECTION OF HORROR and X3 are all 99 cents from now until the first week of November.

So, make sure you all get in on the deals!

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So, Let’s Talk about Why You Didn’t Like My Book

Wouldn’t we all love to ask a reader that? Especially those one-star jerks who leave NO EXPLANATION AT ALL? Yeah, you guys suck. In case you’re wondering, here’s one question we’d ask readers who didn’t like our books. Except Michael, who has to make sense and be rational all the time.

Michael: I have no questions. He or she has bought it so have every right to opine.

Katrina: There was one reviewer who couldn’t believe ALL DARLING CHILDREN was published because apparently it was so bad that anyone who okayed the publishing was obviously stupid. I’d probably ask her what put her in such a bad mood that she needed to be so horrible. It wasn’t as if she was criticizing any one or two things; she was just being shitty.

Christian: What’s wrong with you? Are you some kind of fucking dunderhead? Hello? McFly?

I’m kidding. I have no idea what I would ask them. If someone doesn’t love you, you just have to accept it. You can’t make them love you. Bonnie Raitt was right. I tried that before and ended up with a body buried in the garden.

Steve: “The fuck’s your problem, jack? Got a small penis or something?” I was once drinking with a friend who asked this question to a particularly petulant doorman. The question got his nose broke in answer, but it was worth it, I think. (Although it wasn’t my nose, to be fair.)

Liam: “Hey, if your favorite book is To Kill a Mockingbird, what in hell are you doing reading my stuff anyway?”

Renee: Where did I lose you? How can I get you back? Please love me!

Just kidding. Seriously, I’d want to know what it was that turned them off. Sometimes, it’s just a matter of they didn’t like it and there’s nothing I can do about it.

So, basically, when leaving reviews, don’t be mean. If you have to be mean, at least explain where the author went wrong, so that they never make the same mistake again. Let’s turn this around now. Readers, what’s one question you’ve wanted to ask an author about a book you hated? (You don’t have to name names or books, just put the question out there and maybe you’ll get an answer.)

Book Review: The Outsider

by C.M. Saunders

 

the outsider

Title: The Outsider

Author: Stephen King

Website: https://www.stephenking.com/

News of this release first broke back in August 2017 when King let something slip during a USA Today interview. Constant Readers then had to endure an anxious 10-month wait until they could get their grubby paws on physical copies. In fairness, it was worth the wait.

The Outsider starts almost like a police procedural, quite reminiscent of the recent Bill Hodges trilogy, when an 11-year old boy is found murdered and mutilated. However, things soon take a supernatural turn when it transpires that the chief suspect, the man who was identified by eye witnesses and left DNA evidence at the scene, was apparently in another city miles away at the time of the murder. What’s more, he can prove it. This, understandably, throws a spanner in the works and leaves the local law enforcement in a bit of a quandary. It’s an impossible crime, kinda like a locked-room murder, SK style.

At almost 600 pages, The Outsider is a pretty substantial addition to the Stephen King library, both literally and figuratively, and keeps up his recent hot streak. It illustrates his usual mechanism of juxtaposing the ordinary and the extraordinary, or in this case the possible and the impossible, seamlessly. As evidence for both sides mounts and opinions shift, you can’t help but feel for poor Terry Maitland, the well-respected cornerstone of the community who is accused of such an unthinkable crime. As ever, King’s character-building is exemplary, and his attention to detail unparalleled. Unusually, the premise is both outlandish and unnervingly plausible as it builds towards a shocking climax.

Somewhat predictably, it was recently announced that The Outsider will be shortly be produced as a TV mini-series, much like The Stand. On the face of it, the Outsider seems like perfect TV fodder.

dead-of-night-reissue

Dead of Night, the new novella by C.M. Saunders, is OUT NOW!

Young lovers, Nick and Maggie, decide to escape the city to spend a romantic weekend camping deep in the idyllic countryside. The excursion begins well, but soon degenerates into a maelstrom of terror when one of them comes face to face with a centuries-old civil war soldier. Together, the couple flee into the wilderness, but soon find engaged in a mortal battle with a group of long-dead Confederate bushwackers.

PLEASE NOTE: This is a story of extreme horror and is not suitable for children.

And don’t forget to visit his blog!

 

 

 

Favorite Things: Musical Edition

Christian had this idea that you guys might enjoy knowing a few of our favorite things. Maybe he was wrong, but we’re going to tell you anyway. This week, let’s all share our favorite album (music, for you young folks like Katrina who aren’t aware that such things are still in some people’s vocabulary). For many of us, music is crucial to getting in the right head space for writing, so finding a whole collection of songs that make us happy is pretty important.

Christian: I’m a rocker at heart, so I’m going for Def Leppard’s Hysteria. It’s just the perfect album. Sometimes the best works of art are born out of adversity, and this album certainly was because drummer Rick savage lost his arm in a car accident prior to recording. Twelve tracks, seven singles and 25 million sales, it epitomizes eighties garishness and excess and Mutt Lange’s production means it still sounds as fresh today as it did when it was released over thirty years ago. A bit of trivia: at over 62 minutes, at the time it was one of the longest albums ever released, which is why it sounds like shit on vinyl.

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Katrina: What is this? The early aughts? We don’t do albums anymore. Songs. Podcasts. Hooks. Bits of words with a little bit of electro playing in the background. (None of which I can name without saying “You know, that one that goes dun-dun-duh and then there’s this weird high-pitched scream?”)

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Renee: They call them albums here and here and here. Just so you all know, we’re not old. They’re still albums.

Katrina,

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Anyway, can I have a top three? Well, I’m going to do it anyway. I love Hysteria, which Christian already mentioned, but it’s not a favorite. Although, Pour Some Sugar on Me, Animal and Love Bites are among my favorite songs (a list longer than my favorite books), my top three favorite albums are movie soundtracks. The first, obviously, is the Dirty Dancing Soundtrack. I listened to that thing back in the day a million times. I actually wore the tape out. (Yes, I’m old enough to have listened to cassette tapes.) The other two are Cocktail and Footloose. There isn’t a single song I don’t like on any of these albums, which I can’t say about anything else.

You all thought I’d say Nickelback, didn’t you? *sniff*

Tony: I haven’t thought about albums in a while. Nowadays it’s stream a Pandora channel and forget about it. I have to reach back to think of a favorite album and the one that first comes to mind is Iron Maiden: Number of the Beast. I was a big heavy metal guy in high school and listened to Iron Maiden pretty much nonstop. Today I’ll stream the blues when I write, occasionally Beastie Boys. But Iron Maiden, on the rare occasion. I can’t remember where I put my keys but I still know the words to The Trooper. Go figure.

Liam: Hmm. This depends on the genre, but if I really have to choose only one… I’d have to go with The Complete Recordings of Robert Johnson, with David Bromberg’s My Own House as a close second, in a dead tie with Dervish, Live at Palma.

Peter: Couldn’t honestly say, I rarely listen to anything other than generic radio nonsense in the car.

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Mike: Tough one. Again, let the reader choose. Bob Dylan’s John Wesley Hardin/Highway 61 revisited/ Blood on the Tracks/ Street legal/ Desire, Rolling Stones, Gimme Shelter, Sticky Fingers, or Exile on Main Street.

Steve: Death to the Pixies. I know it’s gauche to select a ‘best of’ compilation as a favourite album, but hear me out. It wasn’t easy building musical taste before the internet. I had to hop on a train if I wanted to find interesting albums, and we had all of maybe two radio stations dedicated to new music- which back then was mostly the Spice Girls on repeat.

I ended up snaffling through the discarded tapes and CDs of my older siblings, slowly working out what I was supposed to like, and what I actually liked. Stumbling onto the Pixies was a revelation. Something about the manic emotional ambivalence, and the silly seriousness of it. It had a timeless, kind of grubby sexual vibe that I still to this day associate with awkward-but-rocket-fuelled teenage libido. For a while I was flying solo on the pixies- they were a difficult act to sell to my friends who were all about the Deftones or whatever, but when they came back with Death to The Pixies, suddenly they were everywhere, and I was very briefly cool.

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What do you all think? Good choices? If not, please, point us in a direction. Wow us with your recommendations for best album ever.